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The Future of Transportation - Exoskeletons in Suburbia

You are standing in a quiet suburb of the near future. Maybe fifty or a hundred years away. How will things have changed in terms of transport?

Certainly the noise of fossil fuel engines will be gone, replaced by quiet self driving cars making up mass transit systems. Emitting sleek, scifi sounds to warn pedestrians. Some head out on special lines towards the edge of the city to link up with the Hyperloop.

What of those bipedal pedestrians? The young and able will still be using their limbs to move but what of the old? Will the omnipresent mobility scooter be a distant memory, replaced by legions of the old strutting around in whirring exoskeletons? Who no longer need a helping hand across the street and if you try to steal that old lady's handbag she'll punch you like Iron Man.

More likely these descendants of the children now playing around us will be using self driving cars door to door. Perhaps aided by a humanoid care assistant to their home.

You'll notice that white van man has disappeared, but look up and you can see his replacement - swarms of drones flying back and forth.

Look higher and you can just see giant, hybrid airships hauling the really heavy stuff.

Higher still will be the jet planes and their contrails. Still around.

Highest of all, out of sight beyond the thin cirrus clouds will be the hypersonic airships whisking the plutocracy between the great global mega cities.

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